Tiny Town, Big Heat

Tiny Town, Big Heat

May 28, 2012

Journal

Last week Lloyd mentioned in passing that we might be be helping Deb Fischer (candidate for U.S. Senate and all-around Nice Lady) with some parade stuff this weekend. I laughed nervously, as I always do when politics are mentioned around me. “I don’t have to talk, right?” I asked. Lloyd nodded his assent.

Well, it turned out to be a combo Memorial Day/Q125 celebration in Gresham, Nebraska – a tiny, tiny little town west of here with a population of 283.

Yes. 253.

When we passed the town sign with it’s population information, I thought, “Well, at least this will be quick. 53 people walking, 200 watching.” I was wrong.

See, a Q125 is a quasquicentennial. How do I know that word? Well, when we went on choir tour to Germany back in 1992, Nebraska was having its quasquicentennial and we, as ‘ambassadors’, had to wear some ugly red t-shirts and sing in various town squares, and then receive the key to the city/town/village. (If you ever need to stay overnight in Germany, I can let you in.) The first time we sang in that capacity, it was a million degrees out, I had sweat seeping through my khaki pants and I wanted to just die auf deutch.

Sorry, long side story. Anyway, since it was the Q125 in Gresham, they had many, many, many people…. in the parade. There were nearly sixty or so entries, mostly fire trucks, tractors and old cars, but a few actual floats. (I feel floats are important for true parade status.)

There you go - a little effort.

As in Germany, it was also a million degrees in Gresham, but we had a nice breeze and I wore a skirt, so at least I didn’t want to expire.

Look at how young they are. Her team is made up of children.  Children!

It was great. We walked down one street and then up Main Street handing out stickers as Deb waved and greeted people. (She really is amazing.)

We're on the side road and haven't reached Main Street yet.

This lady made me so happy. She was Miss Gresham back in 1962.

My kingdom for a portrait like that.

That’s her beautiful granddaughter sitting beside her. Just lovely – both of them! (This also reminds me that I never got my tiara back that I loaned out. Hmmmmph.)

Do you think she thought she'd still be in Gresham?

The absolute best part was that since this was such a tiny town, the parade announcer had little personal things to say about each entry. “Here’s Ed Johnson driving his 1952 John Deere tractor that won Best Paint at the county fair. Ed, when’d you get that tractor?”

Main Street is about four blocks long.

About Lauren

Lauren Sommerer is a preschool teacher who likes to build prototypes, grow cats, cook things once, save money, reduce, reuse and recycle.

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12 Responses to “Tiny Town, Big Heat”

  1. Brad Said on:

    Were there any crazy people amongst the spectators who were yelling and waving? Did you throw candy at people?

    Reply

    • Lauren Said on:

      Ha! I see what you did there. 😉 Deb’s crew did have buckets of candy, but I said I didn’t want to throw any due to poor aim. I’d hate for a child to lose an eye and have it blamed on her campaign.

      Reply

  2. Deborah Said on:

    Which one is Deb? I’ve seen her on TV but don’t recognize her. Maybe it’s the heat.

    P.S. I think I still have my Q125 shirt with sweat stains.

    Reply

  3. Kristi Said on:

    Ah, the Q125 memories….. Hot, sticky, sweaty. Ya, good times.

    Reply

  4. Jill Said on:

    Yay for supporting Deb! I did some phone calling/volunteering for her pre--election. Great lady indeed.

    Reply

  5. Gretchen Said on:

    A million degrees in Germany? Hmm, haven’t experienced that yet. Was that celsius or fahrenheit?
    And yes, I’d like to borrow your keys to various cities. I’d bet that would be cheaper lodging than we’ve found.

    Reply

    • Deborah Said on:

      It was a million degrees celsius and fahrenheit added together. It was very hot!

      Reply

    • Lauren Said on:

      It wasn’t supposed to be hot -- they told us to bring clothes for a cool, often damp, spring. I had a few short-sleeved shirts and a dress, but the rest was all long-sleeves and pants. They had a freakishly hot spell there at the start and we were woefully unprepared.

      Reply

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